Twelve Ways to Get Enveloped in Big Bend

This is what it is to be enveloped by Big Bend National Park in springtime:

Big Bend Sky by Jann Alexander ©2015

Big Bend Sky by Jann Alexander ©2015

Start with the sky at sunset, looking all the way through The Window to Mexico, and let it envelope you.


Look Up by Jann Alexander ©2015

Look Up by Jann Alexander ©2015

Take a hike, and look up to be enveloped by the stark desert around you.


Spring Reward by Jann Alexander ©2015

Spring Reward by Jann Alexander ©2015

Look down, and find bright springtime rewards atop the spiny cactus.


Nosy Jays by Jann Alexander ©2015

Nosy Jays by Jann Alexander ©2015

Stop for a snack on the trail, become enveloped by your surroundings and be surprised by the sudden appearance of some nosy Mexican jays, happy to share your food.


Beware by Jann Alexander ©2015

Beware by Jann Alexander ©2015

Always be aware, lest a bear decides to envelope you. In which case, it’s your fault—for trailing food crumbs or tempting them with your unattended backpack, or because you came between a mama and her cubs.


Lone Survivor by Jann Alexander ©2015

Lone Survivor by Jann Alexander ©2015

Climb to the summit, and be enveloped by the stark landscape that thrives all around you.


Flight by Jann Alexander ©2015

Flight by Jann Alexander ©2015

Enjoy your awe when a huge black raven takes flight right above your head.


Cliffs and Canyon Wrens by Jann Alexander ©2015

Cliffs and Canyon Wrens by Jann Alexander ©2015

When you’re surrounded by the Hot Springs cliffs on the Wild and Scenic Rio Grande River, and the many canyon wrens who make their home there, let them envelope you with sweet birdsong.


Pictographs by Jann Alexander ©2015

Pictographs by Jann Alexander ©2015

Look closely and you’ll discover you’re enveloped by pictographs, left by other hikers much earlier than you, like the Late Prehistoric era.


No Entry by Jann Alexander ©2015

No Entry by Jann Alexander ©2015

You may even have a chance to become enveloped by Mexican culture across the Rio Grande, if you make the river crossing over to Boquillas.


Into the Canyon by Jann Alexander ©2015

Into the Canyon by Jann Alexander ©2015

Find yourself enveloped by high canyon walls for at least 20 miles into the Santa Elena Canyon, where the Rio Grande River flows from Texas into Mexico.


Curious by Jann Alexander ©2015

Curious by Jann Alexander ©2015

At day’s end, delight in the company of a curious roadrunner who’s not intimidated by touristos like you, but merely a hungry opportunist. Can’t you spare a crumb? ♣

Big Bend National Park is the both one of the largest and the one of the least visited national parks in the United States. There’s a lot to learn about Big Bend, whether you ever get there or not (but why wouldn’t you?); the National Park Service has it all spelled out HERE. Getting enveloped by Big Bend makes the long drive in worth your while. Take at look at more of my outdoor photography in my Naturescapes Shop.


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18 replies

    • Thanks, Ula, you know what? Roadrunners aren’t that small at all. Wish I had a photograph with some context to show that, but alas, not. They’re pretty comical, fast and amazing and it’s always a huge gift when one crosses my path. Appreciate your comments.

      Liked by 1 person

  1. Yes, I was enveloped by a longing to visit Big Bend RIGHT NOW, but of course that can’t happen, although I’ll be in the Phoenix area next week, as close as I’ll be for some time. However, I enjoyed the trip through your eyes and photos, so thanks for that!

    janet

    Liked by 1 person

  2. I loved Big Bend, but I’ll admit I was a little creeped out by all the signs warning you about finding starving, thirsty people (i.e. illegal Mexicans) crossing the more remote areas of the park. It may be beautiful, but it’s a horrible place to get stuck without resources. Really reminds you just how scary those border crossings can be.

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